Emma Davies

Artist statement:

Emma Davies is an academic psychologist and an artist.  She enjoys oil painting and printing collagraphs to depict texture, alongside colour and shape.  Emma finds peace in painting, where the harsh realities of our times feel more distant.

Work statement:

Wanstead Flats and the painting process became my solace in lockdown.  As my world narrowed, I observed more of the changing environment on my daily walks with the dog.  This image takes inspiration from the spaces that are left wild, which change almost daily in April.  Usually attracted to urban spaces, I found a stronger appreciation for the natural world.   The open space became more important to my sense of ground in my turbulent world.   This image also represents strength for me.  My elderly mum died a few weeks before I painted this.  As I started to move through the grief, the act of painting this made me feel stronger.  The outcome, particularly the structure of the painting and some of the frenetic mark making, still represents clawing back strength a few months later.

 

Links to websites and Instagram

Website: emmadaviesart.com

Jenny Nash

Artist statement:

Jenny Nash uses the experiential nature of her photographic practice as an important component in her work. Nash documents spaces of memory, appropriating PTSD treatments, returning to sites of past trauma with her camera.

This enables her to converse with elements of her history abandoned to the unconscious. This methodology is derived from the work of Rosy Martin and Jo Spence who developed phototherapy in the 80’s and practiced within the perimeters of her own methodology of Auto-Pathography which she developed from the work of photographic artist Dr. Spencer Rowell.

 

Work statement:

 

Links to websites and Instagram 
Instagram: @sullenriotphotography

Jon R Green

Artist statement:

London based Artist and Photographer.

I mainly focus in tackling contemporary issues of culture, and personal life choices and experiences. My style of work pushes the boundaries that society places upon us, taking subjects and confronting taboos to execute creative and provocative tableaus inspiring deep thought and emotion.

Working as an Artist I believe that there are no limits to inspiration and content. I express my work mainly through painting and digital image. The myriad of techniques, fashions and concepts of the art world past and present are bought together and imprinted with my own unique flavour and twist.

 

Work statement:

2020 The new normal & Panic

These pieces were heavily influenced by the government guidelines on social distancing and the behaviour of people during the pandemic. In this current climate we are bombarded with one way systems and social distancing amongst other restrictions.

Panic draws inspiration from our behaviour in the supermarket. These items once perceived as everyday essentials that we normally take for granted, became iconic over night and disappeared off our shelves for weeks at a time. It reminded me of Pop Art influences on consumerism.

“Keeping away from each other” is something that does not come natural to our human instincts. The virus is calling on us to restrain our natural human impulses and desire for connection. The New Normal illustrates strict guidelines vs the controversial rule breakers. Every human act painted in red, seems a lifetime from becoming reality again. Not being allowed to hug others, no dating, no sex. No one predicted how long this was going to last for but over the last few months have seen people slowly disregard the warnings and rules.

 

Links to websites and Instagram 

Instagram: @jrg.artistry

Laurence Conton

Artist statement:

I’m a London born artist/illustrator who imagines wicked beauty. My influences come from graffiti, anime and pop-culture. Using digital and fine art techniques I go back and forth from canvas to screen, and back again. She lives to make art from chaos, tech and drama.

 

Work statement:

As I sat down scrolling through timelines, observing the panic of a looming lockdown. I tried to be optimistic as that’s my nature. I thought it wouldn’t be so bad, everyone needs to chill. I think we were all sitting at home with a sense of disbelief and a touch of paranoia those first few days. Soon after I developed a cough… The realisation that it wasn’t something I couldn’t deny anymore, that it was all a bit real.

Still, with age barely on my side, my chances were good right?

My work throughout that period of quarantine reflects my sense of delusional tranquillity. The dark yet kind of familiar humanoid creature in this image could be me, or part of who I was post quarantine. I guess we’re all trying to stay relevant to who we are while slowly losing ourselves to the next normality.

Links to websites and Instagram

Instagram: @lozcoart

Adam Lucy

Artist statement:

I am nothing without my history.

My work occupies a space of revelation. Whether that is the removal of or exploration of a physical barrier, or the peeling back of layers of memory and time. My artistic and poetic work showcases a need to expose the past to gain a new and deeper understanding of the present. My continual exploration of the hidden or forgotten is a reclamation of my history. This genuine need to understand myself and the world around me translates into a substantial body of work around deep human emotion and experience.

 

Work statement:

Dry Run For A Relapse AKA The Safe Word Is Pineapple, April 2020′

Lockdown, Isolation, incarceration.

The first wave, it seemed an endless wave, came crashing down. Two weeks of self isolation and a constant digestion of daily death figures, intersped with boughts of creativity and video calls to my dispersed family and friends. The experience was a shared one, yet also deeply individual. I found my recovery of 9 years became central to this unprecedented moment of stillness,  masks I wore were cast aside and I was forced to look at who I am and where I wished to be.

I climbed naked into the bath, clothed only in a canvas mask, my face painted many years ago and an unopened bottle of wine for company. There lay the choice. The masked, unopened choice. Did I wish to feel the waves of fear, of uncertainty and sadness with a clear heart and mind or lose myself in deep red oblivion?

 

Links to websites and Instagram 

Instagram: @alucyart

Tom Buchanan

Artist statement:

I come from a background in illustration, working across the board as a freelance graphic artist. Image making is an eternal work in progress. Although in awe of the digital process, I’ve always had a love for the tactile, experimenting with assemblage and the endless possibilities of box art. I like to think of this craft or form as a celebration to the lost art of collecting, a re-discovery of objects resonant with memory.

 

Work statement:

Over the last couple of years I set myself to task, illustrating onto ceramic ‘plates’. My fascination was about the relationship in bringing together unlikely objects. It started as a pure response project, using neglected lonely plates as a storyboard. The powder trails are always instantaneous, often the quirks, textures and imperfections sparking an idea. Plates being an easy venture to hoard, I was lucky enough to have a substantial supply at home to feast off over lockdown. You might say my plates provided an escapist gateway that fed my wanderlust. These random journeys took me places. There are some recurring themes, such as urban dream utopias known as the ’Future Cities’ series. The selected titles in this show hint at natures awakening, and the despair of exactly who’s meant to be in charge in these crazy times. The naming & framing of the pieces has become integral to the process. Each plate is presented in a bespoke wooden box frame, colour tinted to accentuate or exalt the story inside. I’m hoping to share my second collection in the New Normal sometime in 2021.

Links to websites and Instagram 

Instagram: @spiralwonders

Rosie Hook

Artist statement:

Rosie’s practice combines the principles of sculpture with the possibilities of technology to create immersive, sensory visuals. She approaches her subject matter not as individual elements but as a tension between material and the immaterial, sourcing content that can be manipulated and morphed by its surrounding environments. Using digital methods she translates natural materials into abstracted digital realities.

 

Work statement:

Rosie’s work explores uncertainties of the material world, challenging our conventional knowledge of spatial and temporal representation. Through a metaphorical exploration of the unknown environment of the deep sea and unexplored land , she seeks alternative visual and biological realities by digitally abstracting materials to create digital biomorphic forms inspired by deep sea imagery and botanical references. These forms counter conventional perception to uncover new/alternative visual realities; synthetic-organic and digital-real.

The uncertainty that follows COVID has created a continually shifting and
delicate reality. Rosie’s work echoes our current unpredictable environment through the distortion of natural elements, sourced from that available within the confines of an isolated home during lock down.

 

Links to websites and Instagram 

Instagram: @rosie_hook

Emma Lilly Thomas

Artist statement:

I am an Artist recently focusing on pointillism using inks on card and acrylic on canvas. My work of present has a theme of spherical shapes, with a slight celestial concept. I have recently been experimenting with watercolour, which has added a freshness to my work. I see the sphere as a universal sign of life, there is no edge, there is no end. It is all a continuation. We cannot control life, for it is a moving ball of energy and no one knows truly what it is.

 

Work statement:

Warming- this piece represents how the world is currently. Broken. Pandemic ridden, suffering from a global climate change nightmare. Surrounded by environmental degradation and ecosystem destruction. Aside from this we have found unity, hope and optimism. Finding new ways to cope with the changes that surround us and our lives forcing us to live in the present. People in general seem kinder. So even out of something broken you can find something beautiful you just need to look closely.

Being able to focus on my art during lockdown was a savour. During lockdown I was isolating in Hertfordshire with my Father in his 80s. My concern was for him. I was unable to work in London so Hertfordshire turned into my home. Lucky I found some art supplies left over from my teen years of living at home and even paint brushes that we’re my Fathers. So I was able to create art while there. Now I have returned back to North East London having to fly the nest yet again. But going back to see my Father when I can.

Art gave me focus, which in turn gave me the clarity that I needed for what is important to me. Loved ones who I hold dear and art that keeps me sane.

Links to websites and Instagram 

Tobias Little

Artist statement:

I work predominantly with digital photography to reimagine my perspective and perception of the world into something close to reality but more surreal and elegiac. I use Lightroom and Photoshop to toy with tones, colours, and overall atmosphere to inject themes of loneliness, peace, youth & coming of age and love.

 

Work statement:

I adore painters. The precise use of colours and tones on the canvas of Meredith Frampton’s Portrait of
a Young Woman or the grounded yet misleading perspective of any of Alex Colville’s works leaves me with the unmistakable feeling of passion and awe. A painter’s canvas is filled with their precise worlds: Their beautiful attention to composition and subtle shifts in colours is nothing short of fascinating and inspiring.

Lightroom is my blank canvas. While editing a photo, I am free to paint my image anew and very subtly play with the image’s tones. Studying my favourite painters use of colours and tones continues to help me design satisfying palettes for my photos.

My first image titled Pearl & Mercury touches on themes of youth and innocence which is complemented by the movement of the woman, giving the photo a playful quality—a sense of freedom and nostalgia.

My second image is from a series titled Quarantine Party which deals with feelings on the opposite end of the spectrum. Directly inspired by lockdown as well as Frank Ocean’s song Siegfried, Quarantine Party emotes loneliness and isolation; a melancholic party with one’s self. Together, these two images dance with perfect dissonance.

 

Links to websites and Instagram 

Instagram: @fe.nce

Lara Hailey

Artist statement:

Lara Hailey lives and works in Hastings on the East Sussex Coast. Her practice incorporates Textile, Installation, Text and Drawing. She works with individual and group narratives, transforming personal experiences into works of art. She is interested in documenting unheard voices as a way to record social histories.

 

Work statement:

Sewn Antidote is a collaborative quilt that reflects participants responses to the global Covid pandemic and the resulting lockdown. The main objective of the project was to provide a shared creative focus and aim to bring people together in isolation. Lara set the brief of making a small circular stitched piece that reflects the participant’s response to the pandemic and the effects of being in isolation. To begin with participants shared their contributions on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/sewnantidote/ to make a virtual quilt.
After receiving 90 embroidered pieces in the post Lara appliquéd them to a quilted organdie and canvas ground. The finished collaborative quilt celebrates the participants creativity whilst providing a social document of their individual lives in lockdown.
Links to websites and Instagram
Instagram: @larahailey_