Rosie Hook

Artist statement:

Rosie’s practice combines the principles of sculpture with the possibilities of technology to create immersive, sensory visuals. She approaches her subject matter not as individual elements but as a tension between material and the immaterial, sourcing content that can be manipulated and morphed by its surrounding environments. Using digital methods she translates natural materials into abstracted digital realities.

 

Work statement:

Rosie’s work explores uncertainties of the material world, challenging our conventional knowledge of spatial and temporal representation. Through a metaphorical exploration of the unknown environment of the deep sea and unexplored land , she seeks alternative visual and biological realities by digitally abstracting materials to create digital biomorphic forms inspired by deep sea imagery and botanical references. These forms counter conventional perception to uncover new/alternative visual realities; synthetic-organic and digital-real.

The uncertainty that follows Covid has created a continually shifting and
delicate reality. Rosie’s work echoes our current unpredictable environment through the distortion of natural elements, sourced from that available within the confines of an isolated home during lock down.

 

Links to websites and Instagram 

Instagram: @rosie_hook

Emma Lilly Thomas

Artist statement:

I am an Artist recently focusing on pointillism using inks on card and acrylic on canvas. My work of present has a theme of spherical shapes, with a slight celestial concept. I have recently been experimenting with watercolour, which has added a freshness to my work. I see the sphere as a universal sign of life, there is no edge, there is no end. It is all a continuation. We cannot control life, for it is a moving ball of energy and no one knows truly what it is.

 

Work statement:

Warming- this piece represents how the world is currently. Broken. Pandemic ridden, suffering from a global climate change nightmare. Surrounded by environmental degradation and ecosystem destruction. Aside from this we have found unity, hope and optimism. Finding new ways to cope with the changes that surround us and our lives forcing us to live in the present. People in general seem kinder. So even out of something broken you can find something beautiful you just need to look closely.

Being able to focus on my art during lockdown was a savour. During lockdown I was isolating in Hertfordshire with my Father in his 80s. My concern was for him. I was unable to work in London so Hertfordshire turned into my home. Lucky I found some art supplies left over from my teen years of living at home and even paint brushes that we’re my Fathers. So I was able to create art while there. Now I have returned back to North East London having to fly the nest yet again. But going back to see my Father when I can.

Art gave me focus, which in turn gave me the clarity that I needed for what is important to me. Loved ones who I hold dear and art that keeps me sane.

Links to websites and Instagram 

Tobias Little

Artist statement:

I work predominantly with digital photography to reimagine my perspective and perception of the world into something close to reality but more surreal and elegiac. I use Lightroom and Photoshop to toy with tones, colours, and overall atmosphere to inject themes of loneliness, peace, youth & coming of age and love.

 

Work statement:

I adore painters. The precise use of colours and tones on the canvas of Meredith Frampton’s Portrait of
a Young Woman or the grounded yet misleading perspective of any of Alex Colville’s works leaves me with the unmistakable feeling of passion and awe. A painter’s canvas is filled with their precise worlds: Their beautiful attention to composition and subtle shifts in colours is nothing short of fascinating and inspiring.

Lightroom is my blank canvas. While editing a photo, I am free to paint my image anew and very subtly play with the image’s tones. Studying my favourite painters use of colours and tones continues to help me design satisfying palettes for my photos.

My first image titled Pearl & Mercury touches on themes of youth and innocence which is complemented by the movement of the woman, giving the photo a playful quality—a sense of freedom and nostalgia.

My second image is from a series titled Quarantine Party which deals with feelings on the opposite end of the spectrum. Directly inspired by lockdown as well as Frank Ocean’s song Siegfried, Quarantine Party emotes loneliness and isolation; a melancholic party with one’s self. Together, these two images dance with perfect dissonance.

 

Links to websites and Instagram 

Instagram: @fe.nce

Lara Hailey

Artist statement:

Lara Hailey lives and works in Hastings on the East Sussex Coast. Her practice incorporates Textile, Installation, Text and Drawing. She works with individual and group narratives, transforming personal experiences into works of art. She is interested in documenting unheard voices as a way to record social histories.

 

Work statement:

Sewn Antidote is a collaborative quilt that reflects participants responses to the global Covid pandemic and the resulting lockdown. The main objective of the project was to provide a shared creative focus and aim to bring people together in isolation. Lara set the brief of making a small circular stitched piece that reflects the participant’s response to the pandemic and the effects of being in isolation. To begin with participants shared their contributions on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/sewnantidote/ to make a virtual quilt.
After receiving 90 embroidered pieces in the post Lara appliquéd them to a quilted organdie and canvas ground. The finished collaborative quilt celebrates the participants creativity whilst providing a social document of their individual lives in lockdown.
Links to websites and Instagram
Instagram: @larahailey_

Matthew Johnston

Artist statement:

Matthew Johnston is an Irish creative based in London. Originally trained in illustration, he is now enjoying exploring the world of analogue through his screen prints as well as his digital works.

 

Work statement:

This piece was originally created as part of a series celebrating human touch and the paths we take to close the spaces between us. The pandemic, which unfolded mid-project, brought with it a new perspective on these spaces and the celebration turned to longing.

Links to websites and Instagram 

Instagram: @johnstonldn

Emma Lloyd

Artist statement:

My work is driven by documentation and observation of the world around me, within this exists a visual diary to record my thoughts, feelings and memories. I combine text work with analogue photography and darkroom experimental techniques to distort my work and represent the more ominous emotions I feel.

 

Work statement:

This series experimented with how I could combine text work with my photography. I scanned in some darkroom contact sheets of 35mm photos I had taken from my time at university. It felt nostalgic to look at them but also very melancholic, as I knew I wouldn’t be returning to university again. I then wrote on top of them with layers of digital text.

I did this over lockdown whilst I was still undergoing the last stages of my degree coursework. It resulted in pieces which illustrate the build-up of increasing frustration and sadness I felt at this time. I used text to vent about the way my Fine Art degree at Loughborough University was ending, about missing loved ones and a whole other plethora of emotions that lockdown triggered. The photographs underneath are sentimental, representing exactly who I was missing, whilst the text emphasises these feelings and why I found lockdown so hard. The layering of text distorted the meaning of the writing, creating a body of words that are almost illegible, to me this highlights the overwhelming nature of
lockdown and isolation.

 

Links to websites and Instagram 

Instagram: @ejlloydart

Nadia Zuberi

Artist statement:

In 2005 graduated from LIPA with a BA in Theatre and Performance Design. After working in costume I decided to retrain as an art teacher, and in the process, rediscovered my love of creating Art. These days I would describe myself as a creative Jack-of-all-trades, exploring my creative process through multiple artistic disciplines.

 

Work statement:

Designing and making for theatre and costume always required a certain amount of inventiveness and imagination. My artistic background has always led me to be curious about the possibilities and outcomes of various materials and techniques. I find I get bored easily only working in one way, or with only one media.

Working in costume also helped develop a love of fashion, collecting, observing small details, and art that tells a story. Over the past few years I have been creating art that reflects these interests alongside exploring themes around natural forms, repetition, documenting, and patterns.

During lockdown I began experimenting with using collage and found images to create surreal imagery from which to paint from. In particular I was thinking about the contrast between the gift of time and freedom afforded to us by having to stay at home, juxtaposed against the uncertainty and apprehension the pandemic was causing. In this piece the girl sits surrounded by things that should bring comfort or joy (pets, plants, a beautiful view), but yet somehow everything feels slightly wrong and out of place. She is centred but is separated from the rest of the painting having been almost completely supplanted by a bleak looking forest.

This is a new process for me that I am looking forward to exploring more.

 

Links to websites and Instagram 

Silvano Maxia

Silvano Maxia

Artist statement:

Silvano Maxia expresses his personality and thoughts through his colourful collages, unique in its kind, which are inspired by personal and social events with a strong influence that comes from different cultures and traditions that are part of his daily life.

 

Work statement:

During the Covid-19 pandemic I have observed how people put their personal touch and expressed themselves through their face masks, you can tell a lot about each person’s personal taste, fashion sense and a lot about their personality. By not being able to show all of their face, people are also expressing their opinion on the pandemic by the way they wear it, or by not wearing it at all. Most have embraced the new “accessory” by personalising it and making it a fashion statement.

 

 

Links to websites and Instagram

Instagram: silchriscollages

Facebook: silchriscollages

Human Condition Exhibition – Edinburgh

“For this exhibition artists explore the complexities of human existence. From the physical to the spiritual, from birth to death through growth and change, we all share the essentials of human experience yet our reactions to life events are as unique as our DNA.

In this show, each artist gives their response to the aspects of life most personal to them.  The result is a fascinating exploration of what makes us human: from the intimacy of portraiture to the wider contemplation of spirituality, the miracles of the human body and the challenges of sickness and loss and love.”

I will be exhibiting a Triptych To Memory, there will also be an artists talk and poetry evening.

Private View 17th October 6pm – 9pm

 

Artists Talk and Music

Saturday 19 October 12 – 2 pm 

Come and meet the artists, discuss their ideas, art discipline, passion and what the human condition means to them

 

Poetry

24 October 6 – 8 pm

Adam Lucy

Speaking Your Truth 

Poetry and Open Mic Evening

Poetry is an integral part of Adams work and a major tool in his creative arsenal. Adam will share a selection of poems with you throughout the event and then open the floor for poets, spoken word and performance from the public. 

If you’ve not performed before we hope you’ll feel inspired be able to share your work. Speaking You Truth will be a safe space to show and share with others and enjoy the surrounding exhibition.

Refreshments served