Emma Davies

Artist statement:

Emma Davies is an academic psychologist and an artist.  She enjoys oil painting and printing collagraphs to depict texture, alongside colour and shape.  Emma finds peace in painting, where the harsh realities of our times feel more distant.

Work statement:

Wanstead Flats and the painting process became my solace in lockdown.  As my world narrowed, I observed more of the changing environment on my daily walks with the dog.  This image takes inspiration from the spaces that are left wild, which change almost daily in April.  Usually attracted to urban spaces, I found a stronger appreciation for the natural world.   The open space became more important to my sense of ground in my turbulent world.   This image also represents strength for me.  My elderly mum died a few weeks before I painted this.  As I started to move through the grief, the act of painting this made me feel stronger.  The outcome, particularly the structure of the painting and some of the frenetic mark making, still represents clawing back strength a few months later.

 

Links to websites and Instagram

Website: emmadaviesart.com

Nadia Zuberi

Artist statement:

In 2005 graduated from LIPA with a BA in Theatre and Performance Design. After working in costume I decided to retrain as an art teacher, and in the process, rediscovered my love of creating Art. These days I would describe myself as a creative Jack-of-all-trades, exploring my creative process through multiple artistic disciplines.

 

Work statement:

Designing and making for theatre and costume always required a certain amount of inventiveness and imagination. My artistic background has always led me to be curious about the possibilities and outcomes of various materials and techniques. I find I get bored easily only working in one way, or with only one media.

Working in costume also helped develop a love of fashion, collecting, observing small details, and art that tells a story. Over the past few years I have been creating art that reflects these interests alongside exploring themes around natural forms, repetition, documenting, and patterns.

During lockdown I began experimenting with using collage and found images to create surreal imagery from which to paint from. In particular I was thinking about the contrast between the gift of time and freedom afforded to us by having to stay at home, juxtaposed against the uncertainty and apprehension the pandemic was causing. In this piece the girl sits surrounded by things that should bring comfort or joy (pets, plants, a beautiful view), but yet somehow everything feels slightly wrong and out of place. She is centred but is separated from the rest of the painting having been almost completely supplanted by a bleak looking forest.

This is a new process for me that I am looking forward to exploring more.

 

Links to websites and Instagram 

Henrietta Loades-Carter

Artist statement:

I think I’m just one big expressive juxtaposition… with paint or whatever. I love colour, line,  movement but then also little details other people don’t notice. I love quirkiness and creating my own worlds. Story telling is a new thing since lockdown. I love found objects and photography and mood. Projection. Music is a big influence and so is inspiring others. Isolation has given me a new resilience.

 

Work statement:

Isolation in the UK was such a shock to the system.

Isolation has made me think for good or for bad. It has made me realise who my friends are and how important connection is between creatives.

After the first two weeks of Isolation and worry about my parents I realised the only way I was going to get through this was to paint my feelings. My mediums of choice were pastel and oil for their immediacy and expressionist qualities, but I started small unsure this was going to work. Encouraged by an ig friend I continued to explore these feelings of entrapment, sadness, worry, what the future held, the endlessness of it, and it even started to bring up hidden feelings from my childhood of feeling small and insignificant. With these feelings in mind I found images from family photos, and also photos of myself and my children posed for my paintings. In this way I found I could portray the emotions I felt. Here are two examples but I painted a whole exhibitions worth of work this spring and summer. It’s just getting me though and I think it will have to again…

Out of the chaos comes beauty and connection and kindness.

 

Henrietta Loades-Carter, Sept 2020

 

Links to websites and Instagram 

RasArt

Artist statement:

 

I am not an artist.

 

Work statement

One holds no desire to influence what you see.  The work created over the spring and summer of 2020, served to filter one’s observations, intentions, and interactions. Learning and unlearning ideas and opinions. Establishing, as luck would have it, a protean perspective in reflective dialogue with the present time.

Links to websites and Instagram 

Instagram: @RasArt.777
Twitter: @RasArt777

Ione Milne

Artist statement:

I create large-scale acrylic paintings exploring the concept of ‘home’. Creating works with slowly built up layers of colour and texture, that are inspired by the individual people and places I encounter. I want to capture the way we use objects, colours, textures and memories to create our own physical, mental and emotional space.

 

Work statement:

With experience in Fine Art and Scenic Art colour and texture play a huge role in my connection to a place. The works I create are abstract still life paintings depicting human relationships and our relationship to ‘home’, through our connection to objects, patterns, colours and textures, the details within our lives, we shape our homes, emotions and create our sense of self. During the lockdown, I was isolated in my little London flat while my partner got stuck with his family in Spain, these nine weeks isolating alone were spent creating work around the objects within my flat and my home, but also from the photos that my friends and family were posting on Instagram while going a bit stir crazy in their homes. As a result, the series of paintings that came from that time are almost dreamscapes of different places and people that I love. ‘A Symphony of Plants’ was made in week eight of lockdown and is an abstract, surreal still life of objects and shapes that depict that moment of stress and also the solace and joy that the homes we have built for ourselves give us even in these crazy times.

 

Links to websites and Instagram